Hihi volunteer needed

Date posted: 18-Oct-2018

Would you like to volunteer with the Island's hihi team and learn from them how ..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Winners of kokako photo competition

Date posted: 02-Sep-2018

The stunning winning photographs from those submitted to the competition as part..

Kokako Celebration

Date posted: 21-Jul-2018

(https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-kokako-story-celebrating-21-years-..

Kokako Photographic Competition

Date posted: 20-Jul-2018

KĊŒKAKO PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION Celebrating 21 years on Tiritiri Matangi To ce..

New monitoring reports published

Date posted: 19-Jul-2018

Reports on monitoring studies carried out over the past year have now been poste..

2018 Concert coming up soon

Date posted: 15-Feb-2018

Our 2018 concert will feature an afternoon of light classics and jazz courtesy of the Auckland Ph..

Wetapunga talk coming soon

Date posted: 05-Feb-2018

For the Social on 19 March the speaker will be Ben Goodwin of Auckland Zoo, who will talk about t..

Rat caught and now takahe released from pens

Date posted: 28-Jan-2018

Thankfully DOC staff Andre de Graaf and Polly Hall and their assistants have trapped the rat whic..

Your Christmas Shopping for a Song

Date posted: 04-Dec-2017

Aka - The Grand Christmas Shopping Expedition to Tiritiri Matangi Island Shop Dreading..

Habitat Restoration

Tiritiri Matangi's birdlife suffered greatly when the forests were cleared for pasture. Many species were forced to find new homes and food sources, and only the more resilient species remained, such as tui, fantail, silvereye, grey warbler, bellbird and spotless crake.

The replanting programme began on Tiritiri Matangi in 1984, to restore the native plants destroyed by the farming processes. This project involved thousands of volunteers, and was completed in 1994.

Central to the planting project was the establishment of a nursery on the Island to propagate seed gathered from the surviving trees and nearby locations.

Pohutukawa was the main tree initially replanted. This fast-growing tree forms a canopy for other slower growing species, shading out the thick grass and providing shelter from the exposed conditions. Taraire, kohekohe, puriri, and many others were later planted once the pohutukawa cover had been established.

In fact, far more of the planted pohututkawa survived than were expected to, and in some areas their 'shading out' job has been too successful, resulting in very little understorey. Some pohutukawa have been cleared in order to create light wells, and the progress of flora and fauna in these areas is being monitored.

Around 60% of the Island is now covered in regenerating forest. The remainder has been left open because some animal species - lizards as well as birds - prefer open grassland or forest margins. It is also important to protect Maori archaeological sites, and, since the Island is a popular tourist destination, preserve some of the great views that visitors enjoy. 

Biodiversity Plan

The management and conservation of the Island's fauna and flora will be shaped by a Biodiversity Plan, issued by the Supporters of Tiritiri Matangi in September 2013. Click here to learn more about this plan and to access a copy.

Photography by Mike Pignéguy © (planting day)