More kiwi for the Island

Date posted: 04-Apr-2017

In 1993 and 1995, sixteen little spotted kiwi were released on Tiritiri Matangi Island. The ma..

2017 Photo Competition

Date posted: 22-Mar-2017

It is that time of year again when we are looking for entries for our photo competition (and phot..

The 2017 concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2017

This year's concert promises to be another wonderful and unique experience. Click here (/concert-..

Shorebird Film Festival at Devonport

Date posted: 26-Oct-2016

Click here (/miscellaneous documents/DevWaderFilms.jpg) for details of a forthcoming film festival c..

Extra Dawn Chorus Trip

Date posted: 20-Oct-2016

Stop Press: Extra Dawn Chorus trip now scheduled for Thursday 27th October 2016. ..

2016 AGM

Date posted: 06-Sep-2016

The 2016 AGM was held at the Kohia Centre at 7:30 pm on Monday 19th September. Click here (/..

New hihi film

Date posted: 30-Jul-2016

A wonderful new film describing the hihi story on Tiritiri Matangi has now been added to the hih..

New Wildside video

Date posted: 29-Jul-2016

Click here (https://blog.doc.govt.nz/2016/06/21/tiritiri-matangi-volunteers/) to view a wo..

2016 Photo competetion winners

Date posted: 04-Jun-2016

This year's winning photographs have been decided. Click here (/photocomp2016) to see the wonder..

Great new ferry fares for Supporters

Date posted: 04-Jun-2016

Thanks to our ferry company, 360 Discovery (https://www.fullers.co.nz/destinations/tiritiri-mata..

Plants

Rasp FernBetween 1984 and 1994, 250,000 - 300,000 trees were planted by volunteers.  The island is now 60% re-vegetated, the other 40% being left as grassland for such species as takahe, for views and to protect archaeological remains.
 

The trees planted were, in most cases, raised on Tiritiri Matangi from seeds collected on the island or nearby so as to maintain genetic purity.

The wattle trees in Wattle Valley were encouraged as they provide shade for seedlings and are also an excellent source of food in winter for such species as the honeyeaters.

A number of plants, not originally believed to have existed on Tiritiri Matangi, have been introduced because of their scientific importance (eg New Zealand Bignonia (Tecomanthe speciosa) and Kaka Beak (Clianthus puniceus).

Plants have been categorised as Trees and ShrubsClimbers and Scramblers and Monocots and Grasses.  You can view a list of the plants in each of these categories by clicking any of the links.

Photography by Eve Manning © - Rasp fern